• Prof. Monther Abu-Remaileh, Assistant Professor (Started August 2019): The Abu-Remaileh Lab is interested in identifying novel pathways that enable cellular and organismal adaptation to metabolic stress and changes in environmental conditions. We also study how these pathways go awry in human diseases such as cancer, neurodegeneration and metabolic syndrome, in order to engineer new therapeutic modalities. Read more…
  • Prof. Danielle Mai, Assistant Professor (Coming January 2020): Danielle J. Mai is currently an Arnold O. Beckman Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Chemical Engineering at MIT. She earned her B.S.E. in Chemical Engineering from the University of Michigan and her M.S. and Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign under the guidance of Prof. Charles M. Schroeder. Danielle’s research integrates precise biopolymer engineering with multiscale experimental characterization to advance biomaterials development and to enhance fundamental understanding of soft matter physics. In Prof. Bradley D. Olsen’s group at MIT, Danielle is currently engineering materials with selective biomolecular transport properties, elucidating mechanisms of toughness and extensibility in entangled associative hydrogels, and developing high-throughput methods for the discovery of polypeptide materials. Read more…
  • Prof. Xiaojing Gao, Assistant Professor (Coming April 2020): Xiaojing Gao is currently a Helen Hay Whitney Foundation/HHMI Postdoctoral Fellow in the Elowitz Lab (Biology and Biological Engineering) at Caltech. He received his B.S. in Biology from Peking University. His Ph.D. training as a Stanford Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow was supervised by Dr. Liqun Luo (Biology) and Dr. Thomas Clandinin (Neurobiology), where he used and created genetic tools to dissect neural circuits in Drosophila. How do we design biological systems as “smart medicine” that sense patients’ states, process the information, and respond accordingly? To realize this vision, the Gao Lab will tackle fundamental challenges across different levels of complexity, such as (1) protein components that minimize their crosstalk with human cells and immunogenicity, (2) biomolecular circuits that function robustly in different cells and are easy to deliver, (3) multicellular consortia that communicate through scalable channels, and (4) therapeutic modules that interface with physiological inputs/outputs. Their engineering targets include biomolecules, molecular circuits, viruses, and cells, and their approach combines quantitative experimental analysis with computational simulation. Read more…

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